REVIEW: Your Last Day – Everything You’ve Ever Known

your-last-day

Energetic, fun, and 99% of the time, extremely immature—these are the main characteristics of pop-punk. And although the new EP from Exeter quintet Your Last Day has the energetic part down, the emotions are heavier than the typical pop-punk “work sucks. Girls suck” record. The EP deals with the idea of struggle and overcoming personal issues and anxieties. Everything You’ve Ever Known is a powerful combination of depth, raw, unadulterated emotion and catchy hooks.

The understated 55-second intro gives you a small glimpse of what to expect from the EP. The gentle guitar plucks slowly increasing in sound lets you know that the EP isn’t going to be filled with some boring ballad-type shit.

Diving straight into ‘Break Me, the band exude a passionate, untameable energy. Pair that with catchy riffs, fast-paced drums, and raw, screamed vocals and you have one hell of a pop-punk tune. The song’s intense yet sprightly nature is very reminiscent of modern pop-punk heroes Four Year Strong.

The rapid, intense ‘Bones & Hearts kicks off with a different vibe altogether. The auditory attack created by the fast, punchy drums and electrifying guitar riffs highlight emotional disintegration and give the track a level of depth that is usually lacking in the genre. The ‘Past Is Always Greener starts off with a similar level of intensity but transitions into a gentle, ambient instrumental. The same instrumental is used in the middle of the appropriately titled last track of the EP, ‘This Is The End’. The song, however, is in the same vein as Break Me, featuring a melodic, energetic tune that stays quite optimistic throughout. The last minute and a half of the track is a disjointed, disorganised, layered bit of pure madness—in the best, most radical way possible.

Your Last Day have produced a fine pop-punk EP here. And it’s safe to say that we’re excited to see what they do next. Keep an eye on these dudes.

Everything You’ve Ever Known by Your Last Day is released on 24th February via self-release

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